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Charles Ricketts (English, 1866 - 1931) 
Oscar Wilde’s The Sphinx, 1894
*****

Whose pallid burden, sick with pain,
Watches the world with wearied eyes,
And weeps for every soul that dies,
And weeps for every soul in vain.
Zoom Info
hideback:

Charles Ricketts (English, 1866 - 1931) 
Oscar Wilde’s The Sphinx, 1894
*****

Whose pallid burden, sick with pain,
Watches the world with wearied eyes,
And weeps for every soul that dies,
And weeps for every soul in vain.
Zoom Info
hideback:

Charles Ricketts (English, 1866 - 1931) 
Oscar Wilde’s The Sphinx, 1894
*****

Whose pallid burden, sick with pain,
Watches the world with wearied eyes,
And weeps for every soul that dies,
And weeps for every soul in vain.
Zoom Info
hideback:

Charles Ricketts (English, 1866 - 1931) 
Oscar Wilde’s The Sphinx, 1894
*****

Whose pallid burden, sick with pain,
Watches the world with wearied eyes,
And weeps for every soul that dies,
And weeps for every soul in vain.
Zoom Info

hideback:


Charles Ricketts
 (English, 1866 - 1931) 

Oscar Wilde’s The Sphinx, 1894

*****

Whose pallid burden, sick with pain,

Watches the world with wearied eyes,

And weeps for every soul that dies,

And weeps for every soul in vain.

ancientart:

Cat and Mouse, Egyptian, dates to ca.1295-1075 B.C.E.

An ostracon is a smooth flake of stone (or, less often, pottery) that the Egyptians used instead of expensive papyrus for drawing or writing. This example of an “animal fable” vignette shows a plump, middle-aged mouse seated on an elaborate stool and holding a drinking bowl, a flower (or a fish skeleton?), and a piece of cloth. Before him stands his servant, a scrawny cat, who fans him while presenting a trussed fowl and a bolt of cloth.
A number of such scenes have survived showing animals acting as humans but with their natural roles reversed. They may have illustrated popular fables, or they may have been intended as satires on upper-class life in the Ramesside Period, when almost all were made.

Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections. 

ancientart:

Cat and Mouse, Egyptian, dates to ca.1295-1075 B.C.E.

An ostracon is a smooth flake of stone (or, less often, pottery) that the Egyptians used instead of expensive papyrus for drawing or writing. This example of an “animal fable” vignette shows a plump, middle-aged mouse seated on an elaborate stool and holding a drinking bowl, a flower (or a fish skeleton?), and a piece of cloth. Before him stands his servant, a scrawny cat, who fans him while presenting a trussed fowl and a bolt of cloth.

A number of such scenes have survived showing animals acting as humans but with their natural roles reversed. They may have illustrated popular fables, or they may have been intended as satires on upper-class life in the Ramesside Period, when almost all were made.

Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections